About - markdavidbailey
Powered by SmugMug Log In
I am a photographer and rock balancer who believes that singular moments can transcend time and space. My work intends to challenge assumptions about what is possible and affirm the power of positive thought. I delight in turning the appearance of permanence on its head. 

My images explore themes of ephemerality, possibility, and intention. The rock balances are usually as precarious as they appear to be, sometimes taking an hour or more of careful adjustment before they stand. Stones range in size from just 10 or 20 pounds to 200 pounds or more. The rock balances rarely last for longer than an hour, depending primarily on the wind, and all too often a balanced stone falls before I have taken a single photo. 

Viewers often ask: “Is this photoshopped?” or “Did you use glue?” The short answer is no. I freely use digital post-processing techniques to convey the depth, drama, and wonder I felt at the scene. I position the camera to portray the delicateness of the balance to maximum effect. However, the content of the images is never manipulated to make it appear to be something it was not, and no glue or hidden prop is used to make the rock stay in place.

I live in Bedford, MA with my wife and two young daughters. Photography, and especially balancing rocks, is a meditative act for me. It is a celebration of the power of visualizing positive outcomes in a precarious world.

Photo by Erik Bailey (http://www.erikbaileyphotography.com

I am a photographer and rock balancer who believes that singular moments can transcend time and space. My work intends to challenge assumptions about what is possible and affirm the power of positive thought. I delight in turning the appearance of permanence on its head.

My images explore themes of ephemerality, possibility, and intention. The rock balances are usually as precarious as they appear to be, sometimes taking an hour or more of careful adjustment before they stand. Stones range in size from just 10 or 20 pounds to 200 pounds or more. The rock balances rarely last for longer than an hour, depending primarily on the wind, and all too often a balanced stone falls before I have taken a single photo.

Viewers often ask: “Is this photoshopped?” or “Did you use glue?” The short answer is no. I freely use digital post-processing techniques to convey the depth, drama, and wonder I felt at the scene. I position the camera to portray the delicateness of the balance to maximum effect. However, the content of the images is never manipulated to make it appear to be something it was not, and no glue or hidden prop is used to make the rock stay in place.

I live in Bedford, MA with my wife and two young daughters. Photography, and especially balancing rocks, is a meditative act for me. It is a celebration of the power of visualizing positive outcomes in a precarious world.

Photo by Erik Bailey http://www.erikbaileyphotography.com